Uncontrolled Asthma: 6 most deadly signs

Children with uncontrolled asthma symptoms suffer from a variety of health problems, including decreased cardiovascular fitness, obesity, and the development of learning difficulties. Adults with uncontrolled asthma symptoms are also more prone to suffer from depression and have trouble concentrating

Uncontrolled Asthma is a  disease that is often inherited and can occur at any age, but almost half of all new cases occur in children under 10 years of age. Asthma is one of the most common chronic respiratory diseases in the world. Here we try to give you more information about asthma.

When Should Asthma Treatment Be Increased?

Many asthma sufferers can control their symptoms, which include coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and tightness in the chest. When symptoms are uncontrolled, asthma sufferers’ quality of life can suffer significantly, perhaps leading to a medical emergency.

If you start to notice any of the symptoms listed below, talk to your doctor about changing your asthma treatment.

1. Experiencing Symptoms Twice a Week

According to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, asthma is well controlled, if symptoms occur only twice a week or fewer.

If you have wheezing and other asthma symptoms more than twice a week, your asthma is probably out of control, and you should see your doctor.

2. Coughing in the middle of the night

Coughing at Night During sleep, everyone’s airways become a bit congested. Patients with asthma often have limited airways during the day, and this can be more bothersome at night. Your current asthma treatment may not be helpful if you get night coughs or early morning coughs more than twice a month.

3. Taking Rescue Drugs More Than Twice a Week

Asthma patients can use quick-relief drugs, sometimes known as “rescue drugs,” to treat an asthma attack quickly. If you use your rescue drug more than twice a week to relieve asthma symptoms, it’s a warning that you should probably increase your therapy.

Read More: Asthma: Symptoms, causes and quick therapy

4. Use of Oral Corticosteroids regularly

Oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, can be combined with rescue therapy to treat more severe asthma flare-ups. These steroids are usually used in “short bursts” that last anywhere from five to two weeks. If you require oral steroid bursts more than a few times a year, it is almost certainly due to poorly controlled asthma.

5. You Have Lower Peak Flow Measurements

A peak flow meter for asthma is similar to a fever thermometer. Both monitor what’s going on within your body. It could be a symptom of nocturnal asthma if your peak flow values are more than 15% lower than normal. The presence of asthma symptoms at night is a marker of uncontrolled asthma.

6. You’re Spending Less Time Outside

When your asthma symptoms are harming your quality of life to the point where you are unable to participate in activities that you normally enjoy, it’s time to see a doctor. Because the stress of uncontrolled asthma symptoms can make daily living difficult and lead to serious health problems, it’s critical to have your therapy evaluated by a doctor.

The Perils of Unmanaged Asthma

Children with uncontrolled asthma symptoms suffer from a variety of health problems, including decreased cardiovascular fitness, obesity, and the development of learning difficulties. Adults with uncontrolled asthma symptoms are also more prone to suffer from depression and have trouble concentrating. Consult your doctor about making the necessary adjustments to your asthma medication.

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