‘UN-American’ Mike and Trump decertify the 2020 election

According to Pence, the vice president has no jurisdiction under the Constitution to reject or return electoral votes presented to Congress by states, despite Trump's declaration at a rally on January 6 that his vice president could "do the right thing" and reject the vote count.

‘UN-American’, on Thursday night, former Vice President Mike Pence chastised former President Donald Trump over the possibility of reversing the 2020 presidential election results.

Following a fatal brawl of Trump supporters at the US Capitol on January 6, Pence claimed he will “always be proud” of his role in upholding the election results.

Criticism of the former president’s claims

The former vice president’s speech at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, was primarily aimed at laying out a pro-Trump platform in preparation for a possible White House bid. However, Pence slammed the former President’s claims, made in the days and weeks leading up to January 6,un-American,  that the election results could be changed during the official counting of electoral votes in Congress.

According to Pence, the vice president has no jurisdiction under the Constitution to reject or return electoral votes presented to Congress by states, despite Trump’s declaration at a rally on January 6 that his vice president could “do the right thing” and reject the vote count. Pence said there are “those in our party” who believe “any one person” could choose the president without mentioning Trump by name.

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The truth is, there is almost no idea more un-American than the idea that anyone could choose the president of the United States, he said. Trump maintains that the election was rigged, telling an interviewer this week that he “never conceded defeat” and was “extremely disappointed” that Vice President Mike Pence did not return the election to the legislatures.

Pence, on the other hand, recognized the “disappointment” of losing in 2020

“Now I understand many people’s displeasure with the recent election,” he remarked. “I understand. I had my name on the ballot. But, you know, there’s more at risk right now than our party’s and political prospects. We won’t only lose elections if we lose faith in the Constitution; we’ll lose our country.”

It was the single clear breach Pence made from the President, whom he has faithfully served for four years and whom he hopes to succeed in the 2024 presidential election. This ambition is hampered by the potential that Trump will run for president again, as well as the blame that Trump’s most ardent fans place on Pence for the election’s failure.

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Pence’s job is to set himself apart from Trump when required while remaining aligned with Trump’s accomplishments that are most popular with the Republican base. He started this endeavour in April with a speech in South Carolina, which was his first public appearance since leaving the vice presidency. Pence isn’t the only 2020 presidential candidate who has to deal with Trump’s legacy.

Nikki Haley, who chastised Trump after January 6, spoke to Republican supporters in Iowa on Thursday night, sharing warm anecdotes about how she worked with him as UN ambassador.

While Pence had mainly avoided discussing January 6 in April, his remarks on Thursday night attempted, albeit gingerly, to confront Trump’s bogus assertions. Pence, on the other hand, appears to be tightly aligned with Trump and a Republican Party shaped more in the image of the 45th President.

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