The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard gives Salma Hayek part

The first film was a minor box-office success, thus the sequel's post-theatrical legs made it possible. If you found the first one in the comfort of your own home and appreciated it for whatever reason, there's no reason to wait for the sequel to join it there.

The very existence of “The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard,” a sequel to the 2017 film that adds “Wife’s” to the title, demonstrates that action comedies have a long shelf life, which is evidently the hope for the sequel’s equally disposable sequel. Salma Hayek’s expanded role is the newish wrinkle here, but it hardly warrants an encore or even an extra apostrophe.

Movie story and actors in the movie

The chance to reprise these roles has come with a larger canvas, with the sequel feeling more like a mashup of a James Bond film (albeit with a lot more F-bombs) and a more conventional, wildly broad buddy action-comedy. The story, at its heart, is little more than a pretext to reunite hitman Darius Kincaid (Samuel L. Jackson) and bodyguard Michael Bryce (Ryan Reynolds) in a globetrotting adventure involving Interpol and this time a tremendous threat to all of Europe.

When the movie starts, Bryce is dealing with some emotional baggage, taking a sabbatical and vowing, “I’m not doing guns right now.” But there’s no movie in that, so he’s whisked away by Darius’ wife Sonia (Hayek), who informs him that her husband has been kidnapped by the Mafia and that she needs his help.

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The rescue mission is brief, but it serves the purpose of bringing the three together before an Interpol agent (Frank Grillo) enlists their help in thwarting a plot against the European Union orchestrated by a Greek tycoon named Aristotle (Antonio Banderas), who could just as well be named Blofeld and petting a white cat.

Kincaid and Bryce are at odds once more, as the former tries to calm down the easily enraged Sonia and the latter worries about losing his private-protection license while deadpanning one-liners at breakneck speed.

Hayek puts everything she has into an extended presence that allows her to cuss and kill just as much as the guys while taking lethal offense if anyone dares to mention her age.

Film directors and their opinions about this film

Whatever success the original had, cameos by Morgan Freeman and (inexplicably given the film’s short) Richard E. Grant have added to the producers’ toolset. Again directed by Patrick Hughes, the film largely seem to be determined to rush from one shooting or chase to the next, providing a less-ostentatious version of what moviegoers will be treated to in a few weeks with “F9,” but with a little more bloodshed and a few dozen more expletives.

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In a summer where calling anything “silly” sounds less negative, “The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard” symbolizes the kind of unassuming diversion that audiences can utilize when they venture out. Despite this, it should be a lot more enjoyable.

The first film was a minor box-office success, thus the sequel’s post-theatrical legs made it possible. If you found the first one in the comfort of your own home and appreciated it for whatever reason, there’s no reason to wait for the sequel to join it there.

“The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard” will have a limited release in the United States on June 11 and 12, followed by a wide release on June 16.

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