Kyrgyzstan’s Prime Minister quits amid the political chaos

Kyrgyzstan's Prime Minister quits amid the political chaos. The Central Election Commission revoked the result of the Parliamentary elections declared on Sunday due to the accusation of vote-rigging.

Kubatbek Boronov, Kyrgyzstan’s Prime Minister quits amid the political chaos. The Central Election Commission revoked the result of the Parliamentary elections declared on Sunday due to the accusation of vote-rigging.

Boronov and Dastan Jumabekov, the speaker of the country’s parliament gave their resignation letters whilst a meeting of legislators following the uncontrolled protests in the country’s capital, Bishkek on Tuesday.

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However, amid the critical situation, the parliament appointed Sadyr Zhaparov as acting prime minister of the country. Zhaparov took a government official hostage in 2013. The protestors have released him from the prison earlier on Tuesday while he was serving a sentence.

Kyrgyzstan’s Prime Minister quits in order to settle up the scattered situation of the country.

The status-quo in Bishkek

According to Kyrgyz media, an angry crowd broke into the hotel when Zhaparov was nominated as the acting prime minister. The crowd attacked the buildings, business, restaurants as well as other shops and started looting the items. The same scenario took place in Kyrgyzstan back in 2005 and 2010 respectively.

At the beginning of the riots, the shops, stores and banks remained closed. The storeowners removed goods and stuff in fear of looting.

In an interview given to the Television, Sadyr Zhaparov said, “I would propose a constitutional reform before holding presidential and parliamentary elections in two to three months.”

Election in Kyrgyzstan

On the 4th of October, 2020 polling has started in Kyrgyzstan. This Parliamentary election took place in order to test President Sooronbay Jeenbekov’s political capital and his ability to establish new alliances to overcome the allegation of the fraudulent voting system and worst economic crisis in the past two decades.

A total number of 16 parties participated in the one-chamber parliament for 120 seats. A US-backed International Republican showed that 15 percent of the respondents were in favour to vote against all parties.

The citizens of the country were upset due to the vote-buying tradition by the parties. A resident of Bishkek told Aljazeera that “People who sell their vote are selling their hope, selling their country, selling the memories of their ancestors and selling their future.”

The country and 6.5 million of its population have suffered severe political tumult in history. However, a close alliance with Russia is also a major cause of instability in the prevailing times.

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