Crematoriums in India overshadows a horrible scenario

The virus is showing no signs of abating in India's capital. Another 395 deaths and 24,235 cases were recorded in Delhi on Friday morning, setting a new record. The total number of new confirmed new cases in India was 386,693, a new world record.

The corpses appeared one by one, one by one, one by one. There were so many bodies that ambulances and trucks transporting them to the crematorium caused traffic congestion. Every day in Delhi, where someone dies from Covid-19 every four minutes, a struggle rages not just for hospital beds but also for a place to say goodbye to the dead with dignity. The rate of death has outnumbered the crematoriums in India.

The Ghazipur crematorium in east Delhi has an official capacity of 38 bodies, and prior to the pandemic, only once in living memory had all the funeral pyres been taken in one day. As a second deadly coronavirus wave crosses the capital, up to 150 bodies have arrived by early morning. The workforce has extended their activities into the parking lot, but it is still insufficient.

Indians expressing grief 

“We tried so many hospitals, but we couldn’t get her a bed even when her oxygen level dropped to 40%,” Kumar said. She, on the other hand, did not have a chance to live. ” He was enraged, as were several others who were burying their loved ones.

Crematoriums in India spilled over

Sunil Kumar Sharma, the head of the Ghazipur crematorium, said he had never imagined such scenes in his 30 years of helping to bury the dead. “There are so many people who have died,” he said. “It seems as if there would be no one left in Delhi if this continues.”

Despite the fact that handling the bodies of coronavirus victims is supposed to be a strict procedure, Sharma claims that hospitals often send corpses over without any protective covering, exposing his workers to the virus. He said that some families tried to conceal the fact that a member of their family had died of Covid-19.

Read here: Covid in India-world sends aid for their oxygen shortage

As the body of his brother, JJ Ram, was brought into the crematorium and put on the pyre, Ajay Gupta howled in agony. Ram was admitted to the hospital last week after struggling to breathe and has been improving since then, even video-calling Gupta from his bed. The hospital, however, had run out of oxygen, and Ram had died, according to the family.

People’s displeasure with the current Indian government

“The workers told us just a few days ago that he will be fine,” Gupta said. Gupta was also a victim of Delhi’s ruthless market for oxygen and drugs like redeliver, which are sold at exorbitant prices to desperate family members.

Despite concerns about its use in treating Covid-19 patients, Gupta said he had spent every penny he had on redeliver for his brother on the black market for 630,000 rupees (£6,100) – more than 10 times the market price – on the orders of hospital doctors.

Read here: Single-day spike of COVID-19 cases in India leads to oxygen shortage

“I feel like something has been lost, and a hole has been torn in my heart,” Gupta said, directing his rage at Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government. He said that the central government was to blame for his brother’s death.

Status quo of COVID-19 in India

The virus is showing no signs of abating in India’s capital. Another 395 deaths and 24,235 cases were recorded in Delhi on Friday morning, setting a new record. The total number of new confirmed new cases in India was 386,693, a new world record. Crematoriums in India are rapidly expanding in an effort to meet the demand for 1,000 cremations every day.

Recent Articles

Related Stories