Bird Flu: First human case of H10N3 identified in China

According to the UN's FAO, H7N9 has infected 1,668 people and killed 616 since 2013. Following recent avian flu outbreaks in Africa and Eurasia, China's Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) called for increased surveillance in chicken farms, markets, and wild birds last week.

Record the first case of a new type of bird flu transmission to humans in China. The National Health Commission of China announced on Tuesday (June 1st) that a 41-year-old man in the eastern Chinese province of Jiangsu has registered the first human case of H10N3 bird flu.

According to the agency, the man, who was a resident of Zhejiang, was hospitalized on April 28 after a fever and other symptoms. China National Health Commission says he was diagnosed with H10N3 bird flu on May 28. However, he did not provide details about how the person became infected.

The National Health Commission of China announced on Tuesday (June 1st) that a 41-year-old man in the eastern Chinese province of Jiangsu has registered the first human case of H10N3 bird flu. According to the agency, the man, who was a resident of Zhejiang, was hospitalized on April 28 after a fever and other symptoms.

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China’s National Health Commission says the man was diagnosed with H10N3 bird flu on May 28 but did not provide details or how he became infected. The patient was reportedly discharged from the hospital a few days later and doctors did not see any contact with him.

China National Health Commission says H10N3 is a bird flu virus first seen in poultry, But it is less aggressive and the risk of spreading on a large scale is low. There are several types of bird flu in China that can infect some people, especially those who deal with chickens. Since the outbreak of the H7N9 bird flu in 2016 and 2017, which affected about 300 people, To date, a significant number of cases of avian influenza have not been reported. China says no other cases of H10N3 bird flu have been reported in other countries.

The extent of the patient’s exposure is uncertain

In a statement to the Reuters news agency in Geneva, the World Health Organization (WHO) said: “The source of the patient’s H10N3 virus exposure is unknown at this time, and no other cases were discovered in emergency surveillance among the local population. There is no evidence of human-to-human transfer at this moment.

As long as avian influenza viruses exist in poultry, sporadic avian influenza infection in people is not unusual, according to the WHO, which serves as a stark warning that the possibility of an influenza pandemic remains.

According to Filip Claes, regional laboratory coordinator of the Food and Agriculture Organization’s (FAO) Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases at the regional office for Asia and the Pacific, the strain is “not a very common virus.”

History of Bird Flu in the US

In the 40 years leading up to 2018, only approximately 160 isolates of the virus were reported, predominantly in wild birds or ducks in Asia and a few isolated areas of North America, and none had been found in hens, he added.

Claes added that analyzing the virus’s genomic data will be important to identify whether it resembles prior viruses or is a fresh mix of viruses. The H7N9 virus caused the last human bird flu outbreak in China in late 2016, which lasted until 2017.

According to the UN’s FAO, H7N9 has infected 1,668 people and killed 616 since 2013. Following recent avian flu outbreaks in Africa and Eurasia, China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDCP) called for increased surveillance in chicken farms, markets, and wild birds last week.

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